BRB crying from lolz.

Reblogged from Kim-Butt-Ly♥♫
edwarddespard:

caerdroia:

tenlittlebullets:

thepreviousquestion:

elainemorisi:

caerdroia:

thepreviousquestion:


femmefrustration:


lacekillspatriarchy:


Probably would need tell the brocialists to stfu. I may not follow them to revolution but I might follow them to other places… … … You know like a bed… Because I want to sleep with like 3 of them… … …  yeppp.
Creeping myself out.


The only survivor then goes on to embrace his upper class life


“is this simply a game for rich young boys to play?”
…um yeah looks like, sry.


*reaches through time and space to punch Herbert Kretzmer for writing that line into the libretto*
See also: “Do we fight for the right to a night at the opera now?” “They were schoolboys, never held a gun,” “don’t ask me what your sacrifice was for,” etc etc etc.  (Even “Do you hear the people sing?” is annoying because…wtf? what are you trying to accomplish?)  There is plenty to criticize about Victor Hugo’s original ideas about class and revolutionary action, but he’s super clear that his revolutionaries 1) know what they’re doing 2) are on the right side of history and 3) do have a significant amount of working class coordination/support.  They’re not playing a game - they’re consciously giving up their lives, and since they’re well-off and unmarried, they actually have more freedom to engage in symbolic self-sacrifice than most since they don’t have anyone depending on their wages to survive.
“Brocialist” might be a decent descriptor for the guys in the musical, but that’s one way the musical makes me twitch despite my love for it.
ETA: I was super pleased with how the film changed the above line to “Is this simply a game for a rich young boy to play?” because it turns the general question into Enjolras specifically calling out Marius.  And yeah, if anyone is the rich kid who don’t know exactly what he’s trying to accomplish here, it’s Marius.

OK I was curious. Because this seems to really mess with bookfans reading of the musical, which sans book is almost impossible to read as fully sincere.
Huh. Did the musical writers just do what musical/movie writers do and oversimplify so much as to gut the thing they were using, or…?

I think there’s actually an extent to which the musical intentionally tries to make the revolutionaries less, ya know, revolutionary and more just tragic idealistic kids. see the lines like “they were schoolboys, never held a gun / fighting for a new world that would rise up like the sun / where’s that new world now the fighting’s done?”, “don’t ask me what your sacrifice was for,” etc. Like, I think it was mostly oversimplification, but with the implicit agenda of downplaying the glorification of all-out street battles against the police.

I am pretty sure the place this actually comes from is that the original French musical was written in 1980—Boublil & Schönberg were of the generation that produced the May 1968 student uprising, which really WAS a bunch of hippie students getting in over their heads and fighting for they-knew-not-what. So the musical, twelve years on, is written with the same vaguely condescending affection we’d reserve for, IDK, a bunch of starry-eyed idealists circa Y2K talking about how the information superhighway was going to end censorship and surveillance the world over.  Now transpose that condescending affection onto a musical about, say, a failed attempt to invent a practical printing press, and voilà—a recipe for INSTANT RAGE from anyone whose frame of reference is the original event rather than the one the author is disillusioned about.

God, you’re useful.  Can’t believe I didn’t even consider 1968 factoring into the OFC’s worldview.
So to amend my previous: the “tragic doomed idealists” angle was there in France in 1980, but I think it’s fair to say that the more angry/bombastic elements are Kretzmer’s work in 1985.  It’s like…the English is ill-defined where the original French is abstract.

Thank you both for this additional commentary - love the musical though I do, these elements are incredibly frustrating. It’s interesting to contrast this adaptation with the 1972 Marcel Bluwal version which, while it would also have been influenced by the events of 1968 given the close proximity in time, depicted them in a very different light and much closer to Hugo’s (and the historical) June 1832.
I’m so tired of the idea - arising from intepretations of the musical - that the events of 1832 consisted of inexperienced, privileged student idealogues trying to impose their revolution on the people, who do a “nah” and just don’t bother to turn up. While - as with many revolutions, both successful and unsuccessful - there was a strong bourgeoise component, the movement itself drew from all social sections. They all believed they had a stake in the ideals of the French Revolution. 

Reblogging so I remember this commentary. It’s kind of interesting how much more condescending “lol clueless social justice warriors” the fannish attitudes towards the students have become since I lurked around the edges of Miz fandom 15 years or so ago, and by “interesting,” I mean “frustrating.”

edwarddespard:

caerdroia:

tenlittlebullets:

thepreviousquestion:

elainemorisi:

caerdroia:

thepreviousquestion:

femmefrustration:

lacekillspatriarchy:

Probably would need tell the brocialists to stfu. I may not follow them to revolution but I might follow them to other places… … … You know like a bed… Because I want to sleep with like 3 of them… … …  yeppp.

Creeping myself out.

The only survivor then goes on to embrace his upper class life

“is this simply a game for rich young boys to play?”

…um yeah looks like, sry.

*reaches through time and space to punch Herbert Kretzmer for writing that line into the libretto*

See also: “Do we fight for the right to a night at the opera now?” “They were schoolboys, never held a gun,” “don’t ask me what your sacrifice was for,” etc etc etc.  (Even “Do you hear the people sing?” is annoying because…wtf? what are you trying to accomplish?)  There is plenty to criticize about Victor Hugo’s original ideas about class and revolutionary action, but he’s super clear that his revolutionaries 1) know what they’re doing 2) are on the right side of history and 3) do have a significant amount of working class coordination/support.  They’re not playing a game - they’re consciously giving up their lives, and since they’re well-off and unmarried, they actually have more freedom to engage in symbolic self-sacrifice than most since they don’t have anyone depending on their wages to survive.

“Brocialist” might be a decent descriptor for the guys in the musical, but that’s one way the musical makes me twitch despite my love for it.

ETA: I was super pleased with how the film changed the above line to “Is this simply a game for a rich young boy to play?” because it turns the general question into Enjolras specifically calling out Marius.  And yeah, if anyone is the rich kid who don’t know exactly what he’s trying to accomplish here, it’s Marius.

OK I was curious. Because this seems to really mess with bookfans reading of the musical, which sans book is almost impossible to read as fully sincere.

Huh. Did the musical writers just do what musical/movie writers do and oversimplify so much as to gut the thing they were using, or…?

I think there’s actually an extent to which the musical intentionally tries to make the revolutionaries less, ya know, revolutionary and more just tragic idealistic kids. see the lines like “they were schoolboys, never held a gun / fighting for a new world that would rise up like the sun / where’s that new world now the fighting’s done?”, “don’t ask me what your sacrifice was for,” etc. Like, I think it was mostly oversimplification, but with the implicit agenda of downplaying the glorification of all-out street battles against the police.

I am pretty sure the place this actually comes from is that the original French musical was written in 1980—Boublil & Schönberg were of the generation that produced the May 1968 student uprising, which really WAS a bunch of hippie students getting in over their heads and fighting for they-knew-not-what. So the musical, twelve years on, is written with the same vaguely condescending affection we’d reserve for, IDK, a bunch of starry-eyed idealists circa Y2K talking about how the information superhighway was going to end censorship and surveillance the world over.  Now transpose that condescending affection onto a musical about, say, a failed attempt to invent a practical printing press, and voilà—a recipe for INSTANT RAGE from anyone whose frame of reference is the original event rather than the one the author is disillusioned about.

God, you’re useful.  Can’t believe I didn’t even consider 1968 factoring into the OFC’s worldview.

So to amend my previous: the “tragic doomed idealists” angle was there in France in 1980, but I think it’s fair to say that the more angry/bombastic elements are Kretzmer’s work in 1985.  It’s like…the English is ill-defined where the original French is abstract.

Thank you both for this additional commentary - love the musical though I do, these elements are incredibly frustrating. It’s interesting to contrast this adaptation with the 1972 Marcel Bluwal version which, while it would also have been influenced by the events of 1968 given the close proximity in time, depicted them in a very different light and much closer to Hugo’s (and the historical) June 1832.

I’m so tired of the idea - arising from intepretations of the musical - that the events of 1832 consisted of inexperienced, privileged student idealogues trying to impose their revolution on the people, who do a “nah” and just don’t bother to turn up. While - as with many revolutions, both successful and unsuccessful - there was a strong bourgeoise component, the movement itself drew from all social sections. They all believed they had a stake in the ideals of the French Revolution.

Reblogging so I remember this commentary. It’s kind of interesting how much more condescending “lol clueless social justice warriors” the fannish attitudes towards the students have become since I lurked around the edges of Miz fandom 15 years or so ago, and by “interesting,” I mean “frustrating.”

Moved!

So, we moved in on December 15, and finished up by the end of December. Now it’s just unpacking. My mom came out for a couple weeks and was a superhero—she redid almost every switch and socket in the apartment, both cosmetically improving things and finding uncapped wires and scorch marks behind the switchplates. She unpacked the kitchen, making it usable. Unfortunately, the water to our dishwasher still seems to not be properly hooked up, so I need to check with the realtor about that, as “working dishwasher” was somewhere in the massive pile of paperwork I signed in December.

I ended up paying a cleaning service to come clean before we moved in, and my partner steam-cleaned the carpets. We’re desperately trying to improve habits.

The new place has some issues, but overall is a vast improvement—much bigger, much better floorplan, heats more evenly, and has epic amounts of closet space. And an in-unit washer and dryer (110V, but I’m not complaining too much).

There is still a lot more to unpack, so let’s call these “before” pictures.

Here is the small bedroom, which is more or less mine/the guest room, since we mostly sleep in the master bedroom. My mom just left, so I haven’t done much in here. The curtains that came with the place let in tons of light at night, hence the sheet I shoved up there at 2am the other night when I couldn’t sleep. New curtains are high on the priority list.

Here is the closet in that bedroom, currently mostly full of craft supplies and SCA clothes. The fabric is eventually going to move to the hall closet.

I’m hoping to fit a very small desk, possibly the nifty secretary desk/bookcase at IKEA (if I can come up with the money) in there.

Bathroom is pretty okay. We are not big bathroom stuff people and I tossed a bunch of old things this morning. We need to put some boxes in the drawers to organize better, fix a shelf in the medicine cabinet, and long-term put in a better drawer under the sink than the hacky one that’s there now. And install something to hold hand towels. We’d also like to replace the door with a shower curtain, although I am not sure where bath towels will go.

Not pictured: the laundry nook, which also features an actual linen cabinet, meaning it holds all laundry stuff AND we finally have room to have more than one set of sheets for each bed.

The large bedroom is primarily my partner’s space, so the bookcase and closet are his, but I have a dresser. We’d like to get a queen bed at some point. Needs more UFing, obviously.
Not pictured: the walk-in closet, which is impossible to photograph. It’s kind of cramped, but holds all our regular clothes + shoes and has some shelf space we haven’t used yet. Very nice thing to have.

We still have a bunch of crap near the entryway that hasn’t found a home yet, some of which needs to find a home outside the condo, although I did take a ton of stuff to Goodwill.

The kitchen, while bigger than our old kitchen, has kind of badly designed cabinets, which are unfortunately not a sensible thing to remodel given the cost of cabinetry vs. resale value. Plus we used to have an overflow “pantry” bookcase, and may again. So we haven’t quite figured out where everything goes.

Dining area, currently kind of exploded. We have had people over a couple times and it’s very exciting to be able to fully expand the table and pull it away from the wall and have space for more than four people to sit, or space to do sewing projects! This wasn’t really possible at our old place.

The living room is still a staging area, although I got almost all the books into three bookcases and am very proud of myself. A lot of the boxes have fabric and will end up in the hall closet, at least for now. The ironing board is out because we were sewing.

We now have space for a cat tree, which makes me feel like a less horrible person. The cats really like it, although we’re still having a few carpet-clawing issues. :-/

And my other cat is much easier to photograph than the black one, so here’s a bonus cat (she hates looking at the camera, hence squinty grumpface):

Tags: ufyh